Page 2 of 3

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 6th, 2011, 11:50 am
by WCarneyJX
Do you mean aluminum tubing with wire hooks? If so, you can wrap the tubing with some thread and glue but you have to consider the weight of doing so. also consider it probably wouldn't have come loose except for the crash...

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 6th, 2011, 4:52 pm
by chia
Nope, it's a bent aluminum metal hanger (not the best method, but what I have available at the moment). Either way, I reinforced it with thread, like you mentioned (it was underweight anyway).

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 7th, 2011, 3:52 am
by jander14indoor
Where's the balance on this new copter? You want the center of gravity to be low to help stabilize it. To high and you'll get wandering like that.

Jeff Anderson
Livonia, MI

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 15th, 2011, 3:21 pm
by kjhsscioly
I don't have the copter with me, but it should be low, we added clay at the bottom

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 18th, 2011, 6:50 pm
by thewinner
And for stability, the top rotor needs to generate more lift than the lower. Try fiddling with the pitches of the rotors and see what works best.

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 18th, 2011, 7:10 pm
by lllazar
My copter's fine on stability now but i still can't seem to keep it up in the air as long as i'd like. It's still wavering around 1:40 flight times, after i changed the pitch around a few times. Gah, if i could just get more lift for longer, im sure i could easily break 2:00 with the number of winds im putting in....

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 18th, 2011, 7:20 pm
by illusionist
And for stability, the top rotor needs to generate more lift than the lower. Try fiddling with the pitches of the rotors and see what works best.
From what I've heard (from multiple people), the lower rotor should be at a higher pitch. I think there is a discussion on that somewhere in the Helicopter threads.

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 19th, 2011, 6:51 am
by thewinner
And for stability, the top rotor needs to generate more lift than the lower. Try fiddling with the pitches of the rotors and see what works best.
From what I've heard (from multiple people), the lower rotor should be at a higher pitch. I think there is a discussion on that somewhere in the Helicopter threads.
I think that's because when the lower rotor is at a higher pitch, it increases it's drag, therefore making the top rotor spin faster and produce more lift.
I may be terribly wrong, though.

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 24th, 2011, 12:56 pm
by mrsteven
My copter's fine on stability now but i still can't seem to keep it up in the air as long as i'd like. It's still wavering around 1:40 flight times, after i changed the pitch around a few times. Gah, if i could just get more lift for longer, im sure i could easily break 2:00 with the number of winds im putting in....
what design are you using? double rotor with 1 fixed? Rubber width?
^^ all stuff that can effect it.
(and just for my curiousity I saw you were also from IL, what team are you on?)

Re: Helicopter Testing

Posted: March 24th, 2011, 1:17 pm
by aubrey048
I've got a double rotor with one fixed. It worked pretty well for us, more predictable than double free-spinning rotors.

What kind of lubricant did you all use? (Just wondering. We used Armorall)