Road Scholar

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oh joy
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Re: Road Scholar

Post by oh joy » November 25th, 2008, 12:50 pm

On a highway map, are exits a mile away from each other?
내 호버크라프트는 장어로 가득 차 있어요

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Re: Road Scholar

Post by starpug » November 25th, 2008, 5:12 pm

oh joy wrote:On a highway map, are exits a mile away from each other?
Not just on a highway map :lol: atleast on interstates I believe, unless your going through a place such as the mojave desert where there are no exits for atleast 50 or so miles
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Re: Road Scholar

Post by eak227 » November 25th, 2008, 6:36 pm

No they are not. Not always.

Some states number their exits by the mile number, but others just go up, regardless of how far apart they are.

Check out wikipedia of course.

It just depends on what type of system each highway uses.

Edit: Here's the best answer I found:
In most states, the exit numbers correspond to the mileage markers on the Interstates. However, on I-19 in Arizona, length is measured in kilometers instead of miles, in part because the road runs south to the Mexican border. On most even-numbered Interstates, mileage count increases from west to east; on odd-numbered Interstates, mileage count increases from south to north. Some tollways, including the New York State Thruway and Jane Addams Memorial Tollway, use radial exit numbering schemes. Exits on the New York State Thruway count up from Yonkers traveling north, and then west from Albany. On the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway, mileage markers count up from Chicago-O'Hare International Airport traveling west.

Many northeastern states label exit numbers sequentially, regardless of how many miles have passed between exits. States in which Interstate exits are still numbered sequentially are Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont. Maine, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Georgia, and Florida followed this system for a number of years, but recently converted to mileage-based exit numbers. The Pennsylvania Turnpike uses both mile marker numbers and sequential numbers. Mile marker numbers are used for signage, while sequential numbers are used for numbering interchanges internally. The New Jersey Turnpike also has sequential numbering, but other Interstates within New Jersey generally use mile markers.
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Re: Road Scholar

Post by Skystrider » November 25th, 2008, 7:49 pm

A non-exhaustive list of map types in my Civil Drafting text book comes up with this:

Aeronautical Charts
Cadastral Maps (A map that shows the features of a city or town, used for city development and taxation)
Quadrangle Maps
Engineering Maps
Geographical Maps (Continents, countries etc.)
Hydrologic Maps
Military Maps
Nautical Charts
Photogrammetric Maps
Topographic Maps
Planning Maps
Geologic Maps
And etc.

Remember that this event exists to test your ability to understand technical information that is in a graphical form. So, the proctor hands you a bunch of questions, as well as the answers to those questions in the form of a map. It is your job to sort out the relevant information from the cruft. The Gods of the National Board have decided that the skill of data-mining is useful for all scientists, and so we have this event.

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Re: Road Scholar

Post by oh joy » December 1st, 2008, 12:35 pm

wait, so what do the little #'s on the hwymap exit squares do?
내 호버크라프트는 장어로 가득 차 있어요

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Re: Road Scholar

Post by eak227 » December 1st, 2008, 12:40 pm

On a highway map, each highway will have (some of the) exits marked with squares. Along the highway, there will be (typically red) arrows pointing to some of these exits. Along the highway you'll also see little numbers in red (usually in the 20s). Those red numbers mark the distance between the two red arrows it lies between. So if you want to know how far it is between any two exits, you add up the miles of each segment.
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Re: Road Scholar

Post by oh joy » December 1st, 2008, 12:46 pm

thank u! that wuz big help!!! :D
내 호버크라프트는 장어로 가득 차 있어요

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Re: Road Scholar

Post by starpug » December 1st, 2008, 4:01 pm

Oh yeah I remember that one of the questions on the Road Scholar test at regionals was to determine how far the distance was from a city in central california to a lake in Northern California and it gave specific directions on what highways to take so we decided to add up all of those numbers between the two places.
It took awhile, the calculator we were using couldn't hold all the numbers so we had to press enter then continue adding numbers. :D
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please. - Mark Twain

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Re: Road Scholar

Post by robotman » December 2nd, 2008, 7:19 pm

i love road scholar when that happens it makes it enteresting
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Re: Road Scholar

Post by eyeball138 » December 3rd, 2008, 3:32 am

For me, that's one of the least interesting parts of the event. Counting numbers is basiclly what it is. Of course you need to be careful to count all the numbers, stay on the correct road, etc. I enjoy something like the map drawing better because it really gets you involved in the event.
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