Astronomy C

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crazy77
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by crazy77 » February 23rd, 2011, 1:42 pm

has this topic ever been done before besides last year? Say, 4, 5, 6+ years ago?

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Re: Astronomy C

Post by dreaminghigh » February 24th, 2011, 11:07 am

FullMetalMaple wrote:
I can't really find any good pictures for epsilon aurigae though. And you know how typically the images that show up on google are the colorized ones where things aren't really the color that they are in the picture but they add the color to kind of make it easier to see things? Will they ever use that on a test or only the plain, black and white images? It can be pretty hard to identify a lot of these things without the color.
That's because there really aren't any. Truthfully, I don't think I've ever seen an ID for Epsilon Aurigae, if that makes you feel any better. I've seen black and white images only once before, but they're usually in color. I think the images I have in my notes are from Google images (my brother actually found all the images we have in our notes), and it's usually fairly easy to identify things with just those images. Now that I think about it, NASA's image gallery is an excellent source. I just looked at it, and all the images on my regional test were from there.
Ahh, thank you. Thank you. That kind of helps, but my head is going to hurt now with all the extra cramming I'm about to do.
You're very welcome! Ha, I wouldn't worry much about it beyond knowing distance equations and how great of a distance you can determine with parallax. :) Are you competing soon? If so, good luck!

Yes, I am, next month. Thank you(: The other person that was doing astronomy before I took oer his position said that on the test last year there weren't any mathematical problems. But, once again, thanks; now I now kinda what kind of problems to study.(:
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by jayadh » February 25th, 2011, 2:08 pm

so I have no idea what to study for this and this is helping a lot, and for that I thank you, but any sites that aren't on the website you can recomend or any advice for the event? :) thanks in advance~
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by JustDroobles » February 26th, 2011, 9:04 pm

Just grab an astronomy textbook and read the chapters about the Sun, the stars, the Milky Way, galaxies, Black holes, quasars, and cosmology. It's a great way to start. An even better way to start is simpler... find an earth science book and read the small amount of information about astronomy to get a base knowledge.

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Re: Astronomy C

Post by weatherguy5 » March 8th, 2011, 3:10 pm

wyu1229 wrote:A binary star produces the light curve and the radial velocity diagram shown below. Star A has a temperature of 17700 K and a radius of 5RSUN, while star B has a temperature of 11000 K and a radius of 1.5RSUN. The primary eclipse occurs every 3.85 days. The separation of the stars is 1.5E10 m. The extrema on the radial velocity graph are 250 km/s and -190 km/s for one curve; for the other, they are 93 km/s and -33 km/s. Use this information for numbers 39 – 52. (taken from 2007 PA exam).

1) Calculate the orbital velocity of Star A
2) Calculate the orbital velocity of Star B

Answers: 1) 220 km/sec
2) 63 km/sec

If you want a link to the actual test, here it is: http://www.tufts.edu/as/wright_center/p ... C_exam.pdf
This calculation is not actually that difficult, though it is exceptionally easy to overthink. If you look closely at the graph, the "zero" line of the two waves on the graph is actually at 30 km/sec, not zero. Therefore, the ENTIRE system is moving towards the observer at 30 km/sec. So this value needs to be subtracted from the measured velocity, since the fact that the system is moving towards the observer has no effect whatsoever on the orbital velocity. So the calculation is: 250-30=220 and 93-30=63

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Re: Astronomy C

Post by crazy77 » March 12th, 2011, 4:18 pm

Someone want to explain how you get the answers to the calculations for the sample questions on the national website? :P Some of them I just don't know how to do and others I do but get different answers...

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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Infinity Flat » March 15th, 2011, 6:46 pm

How did astronomy go for everyone at regionals? My partner and I placed second ( we were state champions last year.) The test, unfortunately, was quite short - we finished with 20 minutes to spare, and we were the last ones out of the room. It seems like Astronomy is just one of those events you get bad tests in, and I'm often disappointed when I don't have the opportunity to showcase my true prowess in the event.
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by EastStroudsburg13 » March 16th, 2011, 8:53 am

I have now gotten second in Astronomy in regionals for the second straight year, to the same Athens team. The tests were pretty well written though, a bit of everything on them. Here's hoping that I can get gold next year. :D
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Gillen » March 16th, 2011, 8:57 am

I have got gold at regionals for three straight years, but this is the first time I will have the opportunity to go to state.

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Re: Astronomy C

Post by TheBalticSea » March 17th, 2011, 5:02 pm

I think this year's regional test (western long island, ny) was pretty good, it was a good length (actually, last year i didn't finish the last two physics questions) and covered a good range of material. I would've liked to see more stuff on galaxies, especially AGNs, but, alas! at least there was some good identification. i have only taken the ny states test once and i found it very strange and arbitrary. it was short, but had many difficult, obscure questions and virtually nothing on the DSOs.
Smartkid, i think we took the same tests. what did you think? my team, gns, got disqualified from states :O (slow mail, much miscommunication, strict deadlines) so please weigh in after you take this year's state test!
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