Optics B/C

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events.
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1472
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA

Re: Optics B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 3rd, 2018, 5:58 pm

Adi1008 wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Restarting...

Explain the joke in a license plate that says "If this appears blue, you are going too fast."

Answer
Doppler effect. When you're moving towards an object (or it's moving towards you) the wavelengths become shorter (appear bluer)

Yeah, your turn

User avatar
Adi1008
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 465
Joined: December 6th, 2013, 1:56 pm
Division: Grad
State: TX
Location: Austin, Texas

Re: Optics B/C

Postby Adi1008 » April 6th, 2018, 9:35 am

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
Adi1008 wrote:
UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Restarting...

Explain the joke in a license plate that says "If this appears blue, you are going too fast."

Answer
Doppler effect. When you're moving towards an object (or it's moving towards you) the wavelengths become shorter (appear bluer)

Yeah, your turn

A student is trying to estimate the wavelength of a laser using both a double slit experiment and a diffraction grating. Using the diffraction grating gives him a lower percent error. What are some reasons that using the diffraction grating might make the estimate of the laser's wavelength more accurate?
University of Texas at Austin '22
Seven Lakes High School '18
Beckendorff Junior High '14

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1472
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA

Re: Optics B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 15th, 2018, 7:25 am

Adi1008 wrote:A student is trying to estimate the wavelength of a laser using both a double slit experiment and a diffraction grating. Using the diffraction grating gives him a lower percent error. What are some reasons that using the diffraction grating might make the estimate of the laser's wavelength more accurate?

Had to look this up :/
You can imagine a diffraction grating as being made up of many double slits. Thus, you get more constructive/destructive interference and less uncertainty.

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1472
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA

Re: Optics B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 24th, 2018, 2:37 pm

Restarting this again... Describe the process of sight starting from a light ray to the sensory part of the brain.

User avatar
Adi1008
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 465
Joined: December 6th, 2013, 1:56 pm
Division: Grad
State: TX
Location: Austin, Texas

Re: Optics B/C

Postby Adi1008 » April 24th, 2018, 7:01 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:
Adi1008 wrote:A student is trying to estimate the wavelength of a laser using both a double slit experiment and a diffraction grating. Using the diffraction grating gives him a lower percent error. What are some reasons that using the diffraction grating might make the estimate of the laser's wavelength more accurate?

Had to look this up :/
You can imagine a diffraction grating as being made up of many double slits. Thus, you get more constructive/destructive interference and less uncertainty.

Sorry for forgetting to respond T_T

You're correct! Here's a video that I thought explained it nicely in case anyone else is interested. Hyperphysics also has some cool stuff on this.

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Restarting this again... Describe the process of sight starting from a light ray to the sensory part of the brain.

Light enters the eye by passing through the cornea, passing through the pupil. The lens is adjusted by the ciliary muscles through a process called accomodation to make sure that the light focuses on the retina. The light triggers photochemical reactions in rods and cones at the back of the retina. The chemical reactions activate bipolar cells, which in turn activate ganglion cells. All the axons of the ganglion cells converge to form the optic nerve. The optic nerve then takes the electrical signal to the thalamus, where it is routed to the visual cortex in the occipital lobe
Last edited by Adi1008 on April 27th, 2018, 3:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
University of Texas at Austin '22
Seven Lakes High School '18
Beckendorff Junior High '14

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1472
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA

Re: Optics B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 24th, 2018, 7:23 pm

Yep, your turn!

User avatar
Adi1008
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 465
Joined: December 6th, 2013, 1:56 pm
Division: Grad
State: TX
Location: Austin, Texas

Re: Optics B/C

Postby Adi1008 » April 24th, 2018, 7:46 pm

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F wrote:Yep, your turn!

A distant galaxy has a cosmological redshift (z) of 0.5.

(a) How quickly is it moving away from us (the observer), in meters per second?
(b) Light of wavelength 656.28 nm is emitted from that galaxy in its rest frame. At what wavelength do we observe that light as the observer?

It's a bit astronomy-themed, but I've seen questions like this come up on Optics tests before.
University of Texas at Austin '22
Seven Lakes High School '18
Beckendorff Junior High '14


Return to “2018 Question Marathons”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests