Anatomy and Physiology B/C

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platypusomelette
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby platypusomelette » January 16th, 2019, 4:29 am

1. Not really, I was looking for the excretory system as a whole. As in: the lungs, the urinary system, the liver, and the skin. 2. Correct
3. Correct
4. Correct
5. 7.4 is correct, and the pH of urine is about 6 6. Correct

Your turn
1. Name two possible treatments for kidney stones.
2. What are the four (really five) steps in the cardiac cycle?
3. What specialized cells are found in capillaries and control their constriction / dilation?
4. What do starling's forces describe?
5. What happens in lymph nodes / what is their purpose?
6. What is special about fetal hemoglobin?
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isotelus
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby isotelus » January 16th, 2019, 3:14 pm

1. Not really, I was looking for the excretory system as a whole. As in: the lungs, the urinary system, the liver, and the skin. 2. Correct
3. Correct
4. Correct
5. 7.4 is correct, and the pH of urine is about 6 6. Correct

Your turn
1. Name two possible treatments for kidney stones.
2. What are the four (really five) steps in the cardiac cycle?
3. What specialized cells are found in capillaries and control their constriction / dilation?
4. What do starling's forces describe?
5. What happens in lymph nodes / what is their purpose?
6. What is special about fetal hemoglobin?
1. drinking water,  shock wave lithotripsy
2. atria fills, ventricle fills, atria pump, ventricles pump, blood exits ventricles
3. pericytes
4. how oncotic and hydrostatic pressure work against each other.
5. they have t cells along with other lymphocytes and check antigens presented to them
6. has higher affinity to oxygen than adults hemoglobin, so growing fetus can access mother's bloodstream
'19 Season B: Fossils, ELG, Solar System
'19 Nationals B: Parasitology (1st), Sci Quiz Bowl (10th), WAYTTTM (7th)
'20 Season C: A&P, Degen, PMod, Orni

SLHS '23

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platypusomelette
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby platypusomelette » January 17th, 2019, 5:35 am

1. drinking water,  shock wave lithotripsy
2. atria fills, ventricle fills, atria pump, ventricles pump, blood exits ventricles
3. pericytes
4. how oncotic and hydrostatic pressure work against each other.
5. they have t cells along with other lymphocytes and check antigens presented to them
6. has higher affinity to oxygen than adults hemoglobin, so growing fetus can access mother's bloodstream
1. Correct
2. Sorta correct. The formal stages are: 1. isovolumic relaxation, where you just emptied the heart and all the chambers are empty, all the valves are closed. 2. ventricular filling, where the ventricles relax and atrioventricular valves open, which fills the whole heart with blood. 2b. atrial systole, where the atria contract and empty their blood into the ventricles to further fill them. 3. isovolumic contraction, where you just close your atrioventricular valves. 4. ventricular ejection, where the ventricles contract and the semilunar valves open, which pushes all the blood out of the heart.
3. Correct
4. Correct
5. Correct
6. Correct. More specifically it's so the fetal hemoglobin can pick up oxygen from the extremely oxygen-rich placenta
Nice job, your turn
island trash trees hs
anat: reg 4th
herp: reg 6th
genes: reg 5th
protein: reg 2nd
disease: reg 15th
fossils: reg 4th
2016: a&p 1st, fossils 3rd
2017: a&p 3rd, herp 14th
2018: a&p 1st, microbe 8th, herp 13th :/
HELL YEA WE MADE STATES

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isotelus
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby isotelus » January 17th, 2019, 10:57 pm

1. drinking water,  shock wave lithotripsy
2. atria fills, ventricle fills, atria pump, ventricles pump, blood exits ventricles
3. pericytes
4. how oncotic and hydrostatic pressure work against each other.
5. they have t cells along with other lymphocytes and check antigens presented to them
6. has higher affinity to oxygen than adults hemoglobin, so growing fetus can access mother's bloodstream
1. Correct
2. Sorta correct. The formal stages are: 1. isovolumic relaxation, where you just emptied the heart and all the chambers are empty, all the valves are closed. 2. ventricular filling, where the ventricles relax and atrioventricular valves open, which fills the whole heart with blood. 2b. atrial systole, where the atria contract and empty their blood into the ventricles to further fill them. 3. isovolumic contraction, where you just close your atrioventricular valves. 4. ventricular ejection, where the ventricles contract and the semilunar valves open, which pushes all the blood out of the heart.
3. Correct
4. Correct
5. Correct
6. Correct. More specifically it's so the fetal hemoglobin can pick up oxygen from the extremely oxygen-rich placenta
Nice job, your turn
Ok, thanks!
1. In the aortic arch, there are special cells called baroreceptors. These connect to a nerve which sends up signals to the medulla oblongata- what is the name of this exact nerve for the aortic arch? 
2. What in the heart allows for coordinated contraction of the anterior papillary muscle?
3. Fibrin is well known for reinforcing platelet clots. But which clotting factor forms the cross links of the fibrin, reinforcing that as well?
4. What is the name of the hypotenuse of the Triangle of Koch, and where is this located?
5. A man has the blood type of iBiB, and is homozygous for the rH factor. He has a child with a woman with the blood type of iAiB, who is also homozygous for the rH factor. What is the percent chance that their child will be AB+?
6. What is the most common cofactor needed for the next clotting factor activation?
7. What are the two main cardiovascular centers?
8. Define the RAAS and how it regulates blood pressure.
'19 Season B: Fossils, ELG, Solar System
'19 Nationals B: Parasitology (1st), Sci Quiz Bowl (10th), WAYTTTM (7th)
'20 Season C: A&P, Degen, PMod, Orni

SLHS '23

amk578
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby amk578 » January 18th, 2019, 10:05 am

Ok, thanks!
1. In the aortic arch, there are special cells called baroreceptors. These connect to a nerve which sends up signals to the medulla oblongata- what is the name of this exact nerve for the aortic arch? 
2. What in the heart allows for coordinated contraction of the anterior papillary muscle?
3. Fibrin is well known for reinforcing platelet clots. But which clotting factor forms the cross links of the fibrin, reinforcing that as well?
4. What is the name of the hypotenuse of the Triangle of Koch, and where is this located?
5. A man has the blood type of iBiB, and is homozygous for the rH factor. He has a child with a woman with the blood type of iAiB, who is also homozygous for the rH factor. What is the percent chance that their child will be AB+?
6. What is the most common cofactor needed for the next clotting factor activation?
7. What are the two main cardiovascular centers?
8. Define the RAAS and how it regulates blood pressure.
1. Vagus nerve??
2. Chordae tendineae
3. Factor XIII (fibrin stabilizing factor)
4. No clue
5. 50%
6. Thrombin?
7. In the medulla are the accelerator and inhibitor centers
8. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the kidneys regulates blood pressure because Angiotensin II causes vasoconstriction that leads to an increased blood pressure.
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isotelus
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby isotelus » January 19th, 2019, 10:31 pm

Ok, thanks!
1. In the aortic arch, there are special cells called baroreceptors. These connect to a nerve which sends up signals to the medulla oblongata- what is the name of this exact nerve for the aortic arch? 
2. What in the heart allows for coordinated contraction of the anterior papillary muscle?
3. Fibrin is well known for reinforcing platelet clots. But which clotting factor forms the cross links of the fibrin, reinforcing that as well?
4. What is the name of the hypotenuse of the Triangle of Koch, and where is this located?
5. A man has the blood type of iBiB, and is homozygous for the rH factor. He has a child with a woman with the blood type of iAiB, who is also homozygous for the rH factor. What is the percent chance that their child will be AB+?
6. What is the most common cofactor needed for the next clotting factor activation?
7. What are the two main cardiovascular centers?
8. Define the RAAS and how it regulates blood pressure.
1. Vagus nerve??
2. Chordae tendineae
3. Factor XIII (fibrin stabilizing factor)
4. No clue
5. 50%
6. Thrombin?
7. In the medulla are the accelerator and inhibitor centers
8. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the kidneys regulates blood pressure because Angiotensin II causes vasoconstriction that leads to an increased blood pressure.
Sorry for the late response!
1. Yes
2. No, it's moderator bands. Chordae tendineae help to stabilize valves while these have branches that cause for more synchronized conduction.
3. Yes
4. It's a triangular structure in the right atrium, with it's boundaries being the coronary sinus orifice, tendon of Todaro, and septal leaflet of the right atrioventricular valve. The longest side is the Tendon of Todaro.
5. Yes
6. Close, that's actually just the last factor before fibrinogen is activated to fibrin. The correct answer is Factor IV, calcium ions
7. I guess that could be counted right, but in actuality the cardioacelerator and cardiodecelerator/inhibitor make up the cardiovascular center, the other one is the vasomotor center.
8. Yes

Go ahead, your turn!
'19 Season B: Fossils, ELG, Solar System
'19 Nationals B: Parasitology (1st), Sci Quiz Bowl (10th), WAYTTTM (7th)
'20 Season C: A&P, Degen, PMod, Orni

SLHS '23

amk578
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby amk578 » January 21st, 2019, 9:17 am

Sorry for the late response!
1. Yes
2. No, it's moderator bands. Chordae tendineae help to stabilize valves while these have branches that cause for more synchronized conduction.
3. Yes
4. It's a triangular structure in the right atrium, with it's boundaries being the coronary sinus orifice, tendon of Todaro, and septal leaflet of the right atrioventricular valve. The longest side is the Tendon of Todaro.
5. Yes
6. Close, that's actually just the last factor before fibrinogen is activated to fibrin. The correct answer is Factor IV, calcium ions
7. I guess that could be counted right, but in actuality the cardioacelerator and cardiodecelerator/inhibitor make up the cardiovascular center, the other one is the vasomotor center.
8. Yes

Go ahead, your turn!
1. Name two effects of caffeine on the cardiovascular system.
2. What ABO blood type is considered the "universal recipient"?
3. What is the innermost layer of the heart and what type of epithelium does it consist of?
4. What is the function of sinusoidal capillaries?
5. What hormone helps in the maturation of T cells?
6. The right lymphatic duct receives lymph from what three lymph trunks?
7. What are the layers of the ureter from internal to external?
8. What nitrogenous waste is produced in the muscles?
2018 - Anatomy, Crime Busters, & Road Scholar
2019 - Anatomy, Disease Detectives, Heredity, & Road Scholar
2020 - Anatomy, Designer Genes, Disease Detectives, Forensics, Ping Pong Parachute, & Protein Modeling

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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby farmerjoe279 » January 23rd, 2019, 7:25 am

1. Increase heart rate, increase blood pressure?
2. AB
3. Endocardium, endothelium cells?
4. What is the function of sinusoidal capillaries?
5. Thymosin
6. Jugular, Subclavian, bronchomedsomething trunk (I forgot the last one :P)
7. Fibrous, Muscular, mucosa
8. Creatinine?
Which of the following is a primary lymphatic organ?
a) Spleen
b) Thymus
c) Lymph nodes
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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby amk578 » January 23rd, 2019, 9:51 am

1. Increase heart rate, increase blood pressure?
2. AB
3. Endocardium, endothelium cells?
4. What is the function of sinusoidal capillaries?
5. Thymosin
6. Jugular, Subclavian, bronchomedsomething trunk (I forgot the last one :P)
7. Fibrous, Muscular, mucosa
8. Creatinine?
1. Correct
2. Correct
3. Endocardium is correct, but I was looking for simple squamous epithelium for the second part.
4. Sinusoidal capillaries decrease blood flow rate to allow time for the many exchanges that occur across organ walls
5. Correct
6. Yeah, it's the bronchomediastinal trunk and the other two are right
7. You wrote it outer to inner, from inner to outer is mucosa, muscular, fibrous
8. Correct
Which of the following is a primary lymphatic organ?
a) Spleen
b) Thymus
c) Lymph nodes
b) Thymus
2018 - Anatomy, Crime Busters, & Road Scholar
2019 - Anatomy, Disease Detectives, Heredity, & Road Scholar
2020 - Anatomy, Designer Genes, Disease Detectives, Forensics, Ping Pong Parachute, & Protein Modeling

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Re: Anatomy and Physiology B/C

Postby platypusomelette » January 28th, 2019, 10:46 am

b) Thymus
That looks right to me, I'll post questions I guess.

1. What differentiates Hodgkin's lymphoma from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma?
2. What two bacteria are most commonly responsible for lower UTI's?
3. Which of these cells are granulocytes? eosinophils, basophils, monocytes, B cells, neutrophils.
4. What happens during each of the 4 heart sounds?
island trash trees hs
anat: reg 4th
herp: reg 6th
genes: reg 5th
protein: reg 2nd
disease: reg 15th
fossils: reg 4th
2016: a&p 1st, fossils 3rd
2017: a&p 3rd, herp 14th
2018: a&p 1st, microbe 8th, herp 13th :/
HELL YEA WE MADE STATES


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